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The Ripple Effect: Strategy in Action - BOARDway Bound

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BWB class

BOARDway Bound Connects Business Professionals to the Arts

This September, ArtsWave welcomed 37 local business professionals as the 11th class of BOARDway Bound.  This innovative arts board-training program provides participants with the tools they need to be an active and engaged volunteer, and then matches them with a local arts organization for an observership.  90% of past program participants have joined the boards of the organizations with which they were matched. To date, ArtsWave’s board leadership program has placed nearly 300 volunteers with local arts boards.

ArtsWave identified the need for a board training program eleven years ago through a series of conversations with small and mid-size arts organizations.  Smaller organizations often had a hard time recruiting Board members.  Enthusiastic volunteers hesitated to join arts boards because they thought that they lacked the expertise or means to be good Board members.  At the same time, local companies needed more ways to connect their high-potential employees to leadership training and opportunities. ArtsWave created BOARDway bound to provide that training and make the connections needed to build capacity for those organizations.

BOARDway Bound takes the mystery out of arts board service.  Information on best practices, industry trends, and the Greater Cincinnati arts scene is shared over the course of six sessions, as well as through videos and a document library.  The workshops include presentations by arts leaders, panel discussions, and case studies.  Topics range from fundraising and marketing to understanding arts budgets and non-profit governance.

The highlight of each session is the “speed-dating” night.  Each candidate has six minutes with a staff and board representative from each of 40 different arts organizations. Both the board candidates and arts clients are also armed with one-page data sheets on their perspective matches. It’s a whirlwind networking event that requires a map and a bullhorn.  “When we were trying to determine the best way to give each candidate the opportunity to meet with each arts group, the most logical method was the speed-dating format,” said Mike Boberg, Director of Signature Arts & Business Programs. ”It is three and half hours of exhausting, fast-paced action, but it pays off in the end with solid final matches.”

This summer, ArtsWave created a LinkedIn group for BOARDway Bound alumni that allows them to easily network and share stories from the field.  “I was interested in BOARDway Bound because I wanted to give back and become invested in the arts and the region,” said Amanda McDonald, Assistant Director of Constituent Development,CCM at The UC Foundation and a member of last year’s class. “The lessons that I learned specifically in governance and financial oversight proved not only invaluable to my career but provided me with the knowledge to be an effective member on the Board that I joined and to lead that organization to serve the community.”

Interested in participating in BOARDway Bound? The spring class will begin recruiting soon.  Contact Mike Boberg, Director, Signature Arts and Business Programs.

Sign up for The Ripple Effect semi-monthly newsletter and stay up-to-date on the impact of the arts and ArtsWave on Greater Cincinnati.

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The Ripple Effect: Making An Impact - May Festival

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May Festival

Cincinnati’s May Festival Chorus is amazing for many reasons—it’s the oldest continuous choral festival in the Western Hemisphere, it serves as the chorus for the world-class Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra throughout the year, and perhaps most surprisingly, it is made up of many volunteers. Over 100 men and women ages 18 to 70+ rehearse at least three hours each week from September through May to bring choral masterworks and new commissions to the region.

The May Festival Chorus draws its membership from all over the Tri-State and from all different backgrounds, bringing people together who might never otherwise have met, but who share a passion and dedication for vocal music. Many chorus members have been singing with the choir for several years—or even decades -- and the friendships and partnerships they make in the process enrich their lives and our community in surprising ways.

ArtsWave learned in Snapshot 2012 that people who agreed that they feel socially embedded in the community participated in arts activities 36% more often than those who did not. In other words, the arts help people feel more connected to the community and allow recent transplants to find reasons to stay in the region.

Lauren Peter began singing with the chorus eight years ago, shortly after moving to Mason.  She enjoys singing with her husband, Justin, a former member of the May Festival Youth Chorus, and says that the process keeps her connected to her artistic roots. “Many of our closest friends are in the chorus.  There are several people we socialize with on a regular basis...and former chorus members that we've remained close to.  For many of us, it's like a second family.”

With such close connections, it’s no surprise that 98% of May Festival Chorus members report creating new and lasting relationships with people whom they may not have met otherwise. 92% report that their involvement in the May Festival Chorus is an important part of their decision to remain in the region. 

Lawrence Coleman, a chorus member for 15 years who lives in Kennedy Heights, also finds that the May Festival Chorus has connected him to a wider community. “I've recorded, had other singing engagements and opportunities, all because I've been connected to the May Festival Chorus and the people in it.” Lawrence also sings with the contemporary gospel group Fo Mo Brothers, performing at churches throughout the region and at the Midwest Black Family Reunion. He also volunteers with District A arts collaboration in Kennedy Heights, all the while meeting new artists, collaborators, neighbors, and friends.

When asked about how singing with the May Festival has influenced his life, Lawrence says, “It has really confirmed my belief that all people are basically the same even though there can be very stark differences. I have friends in the chorus from very different walks of life. We come together for the single purpose of making great music. People of different backgrounds and schools of thought can do more than coexist. We can learn to celebrate our differences when we have a common goal.“

From building friendships across the region to adding to Cincinnati’s long tradition of excellence in vocal music, the Cincinnati May Festival Chorus is an excellent example of the Ripple Effect of the arts.

Sign up for The Ripple Effect semi-monthly newsletter and stay up-to-date on the impact of the arts and ArtsWave on Greater Cincinnati.

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The Ripple Effect: CEO Currents - The Arts Keep Talent in Our Region

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Alecia Kintner CEO

I often get asked why my husband and I would leave our life on a Caribbean island behind to move back to the United States. 

The short answer to this question is similar to the reason why you would choose to stay in a place like Cincinnati: you miss things like concerts, museums, theaters and libraries if they aren’t readily available. After a while even staring at the waves doesn’t compare to the energy that comes from living in the Greater Cincinnati region where there are more festivals, performances, concerts and exhibitions than there are days of the week.

I’m not alone in thinking that access to the arts improves the quality of life in a place. In fact, recent research done for ArtsWave in partnership with Agenda 360, revealed a correlation between those Greater Cincinnati residents who take part in the arts and those who express a positive view of Cincinnati. People who expressed satisfaction in this community and who saw opportunity here were 30% more active in the arts than those who did not feel satisfied or see opportunity.

This past week, as part of the Leadership Exchange trip to Atlanta organized by the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, I was struck again by how integral the arts are to places that are growing and thriving. “The arts feed the ecosystem” of a region, said Dr. James Wagner, president of Emory University, as he reflected on building an innovation pipeline. 

Sure, it’s true that in this day and age we can access a huge variety of entertainment options wherever we have an internet connection. But that doesn’t substitute for being able to experience a live music event in a historic concert hall with 3,000 other inspired neighbors, or discuss a provocative play with friends after a performance, or see how the choices of curators challenge our assumptions about the world through works of visual art. All of these experiences can only happen in a place that supports a wide variety of arts organizations.  

Living with this abundance can make us take our arts scene for granted.  But outsiders see the advantage clearly – Doug Hooker, head of the Atlanta Regional Commission, remarked that Cincy’s support of the arts is instructive for their city. The fact that Greater Cincinnati is home to so many world-class arts institutions and cutting-edge cultural experiences is one that could and should be exploited still more by site selectors, HR recruiters, college admission offices, and tourism agencies.

The arts in Cincinnati are a differentiator for those making location decisions, and they are can be a great reason to put down roots. The arts help make Cincinnati “sticky” – a place that talented people don’t want to leave.

What role do Cincinnati’s arts activities play in your decision to be here and stay here? Tell us at on Twitter or Facebook using #ArtsRipple. 

 
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Cincinnati Free Arts - October-December 2014

The only thing better than the amazing arts in our region is when those arts opportunities are FREE. Check out some of the ways to experience the arts at little to no cost this fall/winter. Join the conversation about amazing arts experiences by using #CincyFallArts until the end of November and #CincyWinterArts starting in December. 

OCTOBER

October 4 is the Cincinnati Jazz & BBQ Festival in Madisonville. Enjoy amazing music, art booths, and incredibly tasty food. ArtsWave supports this event as part of our partnership with LISC Place Matters Neighborhoods.

Opera on tour -  The Cincinnati Opera is touring with Pirates of Penzance, including a free performance at Linden Grove Cemetery on October 11. Part of our partnership with LISC Place Matters Neighborhoods, Center for Great Neighborhoods of Covington

The Constella Festival has a free music workshop for ages 8 to 88 on October 15 at 6pm. Broaden your musical horizons and challenge your creative limits in a fun and engaging manner. Non-musicians are welcome to participate as audience members. Register here.

Exhale Dance Tribe presents a preview of their annual Halloween show, Dead Can Dance, at Washington Park on October 24.

Photography is everywhere in October. FOTOFOCUS BIENNIAL 2014 is a month-long celebration of photography and lens-based art. Though the events are not free, many of the exhibitions are free to view! Join ArtsWave and ArtWorks in our lobby on October 10 from 5-8pm for the opening reception of the J.Miles Wolf exhibit. The exhibit will be free and available for view from October 1-31.

The Off the Hill series from Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park is free all across the region. October's show is Roses & Throns (A Tale of Beauty & the Beast)Find out when this show will be in your neighborhood. 

Washington Park plays host to tons of arts events, including SCPA in the Park on Fridays in October (at noon), Where the Wild Things Play on Sundays (in conjunction with Cincinnati Art Museum), and Caroling in the Park starting in November.

Fountain Square has free music on Fridays with Rocktober on the Square. An after-work music happy hour is a great way to end the work week! 

 

NOVEMBER

Volunteer for free CSO tickets! Log 8 hours of volunteer activity before November 7 to receive free tickets to One City, One Symphony with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra on November 14-16Learn how to turn volunteer hours into free tickets.

Art at the Clifton Cultural Arts Center "The Urban Landscape Six Artists - Six Views”  Six contemporary painters explore the urban landscape and interstitial spaces found within. Opening Reception - Friday November 14 6pm-9pm or see the exhibit from November 14 – December 5, 2014

New American opera with Opera Fusion: New Works. A free public reading of Great Scott will be held on November 25 at 7:30pm at Memorial Hall.  

DECEMBER

The Children's Theatre of Cincinnati ArtReach program will present a touring show of The Night Before Christmas at a variety of venues in December. Check out the full schedule to find a performance in your neighborhood. 

 

ONGOING

Discover more amazing free things to do at Cincinnatiusa.com, including visual arts, performing arts, music, literary events, and culture. 

Love museums? You can always visit the Taft Museum of Art for free on Sundays (thanks to Western & Southern Financial Group). Want something more modern? The Contemporary Arts Center has free admission (thanks to Macy's) on Monday nights from 5-9pm.  The Cincinnati Art Museum has free admission, as well as numerous free events (especially on weekends), like daily tours, Art 360, Art After Dark, Family First Saturdays, and more! 

Downtown has lots of great opportunities for free art. Check out the Weston Art Gallery, located next to the Aronoff Center; discover your new favorite ArtWorks murals, take a glance at the YWCA gallery, or see some free art at the public library

Looking for something a little more risque'? Manifest Gallery shows some of the latest cutting-edge art, and is always free to visit! 

Christ Church Cathedral (in downtown Cincinnati) has Music Live at Lunch every Tuesday! Free if you bring your own lunch, or just $5 to buy lunch at the cathedral.

Wednesdays mean free live theatre at Know Theatre of Cincinnati. Read more about the radical and revolutionary "Welcome Experiment."

Want more info on free art? Follow ArtsWave on Facebook and Twitter to see more updates on free arts events. 

Do you have a free arts event to add to this list? Email our Manager, Digital Communications Rebecca Calkin to get your event added.

The Ripple Effect: Partners in Action: You

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Cincy BoychoirWith increased emphasis on measuring student growth on test outcomes in content areas such as reading and mathematics, district report cards and accountability, there is a potential for lack of balance in the curriculum and a danger that arts education will lose its status as an equal component in the education of all students. In the spring of 2013, ArtsWave began discussions with the Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Arts Education and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education to develop a process to review and assess the status of arts education programs and opportunities in the community and schools in Cincinnati, Covington and Newport utilizing the Kennedy Center’s Community Audit for Arts Education.  The ultimate goal was to provide objective data that could assist ArtsWave, school administrators and boards of education, and regional community arts organizations in making evidence-based decisions that reflect the best possible opportunities for students in Cincinnati, Covington, and Newport through arts education.

Among the findings of this recent Community Audit, the importance of involved parents, teachers, principals and superintendents in strong school programs was underscored:

In school districts with strong arts education programs, the community – parents, families, artists, arts organizations, businesses, local civic and cultural leaders – is actively engaged in the development of arts policies and instructional programs of the school district.

School principals who collectively support the policy of arts education for all students often are instrumental in the policy’s successful building level and district-wide implementation.

Superintendents who regularly articulate a vision for arts education are critically important to its successful implementation and stability. 

Leadership plays an irreplaceable role in leveraging the power of the arts to make students and schools more successful. Your leadership matters, as does your voice in speaking up for the continuation of arts programming. We thank all our partners in this journey to show the intersections between arts education and student success.

Sign up for The Ripple Effect semi-monthly newsletter and stay up-to-date on the impact of the arts and ArtsWave on Greater Cincinnati.

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